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Finding Meaning

For clients with existential concerns.

I am a Licensed Professional Counselor-Supervisor (LPC-S) in Austin, TX as well as a writer. I like to work with individuals who are committed to being true to themselves. This takes courage and risks disappointing others—but is important in terms of embracing one's sense of self. People-pleasing is a self-sabotaging, soul-killing behavior.

I am an Attachment-based therapist with a focus on meaning-of-life concerns.

Education:

Bachelor of Arts in English

Master of Arts in Counseling

 

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Contact

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5126807379

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Social Reciprocity

Social Reciprocity By Elizabeth O’Brien, LPC Do you ever go to a party or dinner and spend the entire evening putting out a lot of friendly energy and receiving very little back? I always know when I’ve had a good social experience at a party or gathering when I don’t come home exhausted. I feel energized, and gratified. I have a warm feeling of connection inside. But other times, I come home spent and disappointed. I feel lonely and sad, in spite of having been around doze

Adaptive Competence—or Getting Back on the Horse

By Elizabeth O’Brien, M.A., LPC There is a term being bandied about in psychological circles—and in the media—called “adaptive competence.” National Public Radio (NPR) did a story recently on the secrets of aging well, and this high-falutin’ term dominated the story. It seems that individuals with adaptive competence, which basically means “rolling with the punches” of life, live longer (by some seven years, according to the research). They are also more productive and happy

Smart Parenting

By Elizabeth O’Brien, M.A., LPC We often have to “wing it” as parents, especially with our first child. Like many parents, there are several bits of wisdom I wish I had possessed early on. One concept I have learned as a therapist would have been especially useful: the concept of containment. Containment means (in terms of parenting) the ability to literally “contain” your own emotions so that they don’t spill over, inappropriately, onto your child. Say you have a longstandin

Reciprocity, or the Golden Rule

By Elizabeth O’Brien, M.A., LPC Reciprocity is one of my favorite concepts—in therapy and in life. Parents do well to model this give-and-take behavior, by nurturing their children and supporting them, while at the same time expecting the child to reciprocate with love, respect, consideration—and yes, even chores! This reciprocity concept harkens back to Attachment Theory, in which the mother “mirrors” her infant: when the baby coos, the mother coos back; when the baby smiles